Press release

PorterLogic Founder Guests on Entrepreneurship Podcast

August 8, 2021 3:08 PM

ATLANTA—PorterLogic founder Jonathan Porter was recently featured as a guest on the Burn the Ship podcast. During the episode, he explored how to create a better supply chain as well as how to be a successful entrepreneur. Listen to the episode to learn about topics such as low-code vs. no-code, what SaaS means, and why a computer chip shortage is happening.

You can listen to the full episode here. The transcript of the episode is also available below.

About Burn the Ship

The Burn the Ship podcast gives self-starters a platform to share the story of their journey towards entrepreneurial success with no option of turning back. To find more episodes of Burn the Ship, check out their YouTube channel.

About PorterLogic

PorterLogic is a leading supply chain software solution provider based in Atlanta, Ga. Our platform allows for added flexibility and agility in your supply chain by making software systems work without the handcuffs of traditional custom modification​s​. Built cloud-native from day one, we understand the ever-changing landscape in the supply chain, and we are ready to help with your organization’s digital transformation.


For more information about PorterLogic, you can connect with us on Twitter (@porterlogic) or LinkedIn (in/porterlogic).

Episode Transcript

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Well, hey guys. Welcome to Burn The Ship, the podcast that inspires entrepreneurs to go all in and connects them with professionals that can help them do it. Today we have Jonathan Porter here. Thank you Jonathan for coming in.

Jonathan Porter:

Thanks so much for having me.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

We appreciate it. Jonathan is with PorterLogic. Tell us about your journey. How did you get to where you're at? What brought you to this industry? What you were doing before?

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, absolutely. I've honestly been an entrepreneur my entire life. I've grown up in a very entrepreneurial family. My parents have a small business in the residential construction area, so always knew I would start a company at some point. Even back when I was in Boy Scouts, I was the top-selling popcorn seller. I actually had a side business in middle school and high school making flyers for real estate agents. I have always had this mindset of find a problem, if I can solve it and make a business out of it, go for it.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

That's awesome.

Jonathan Porter:

Did engineering at Georgia Tech and industrial engineering actually, and got right into the supply chain after that. I went to work for a large supply chain software company called Manhattan Associates. They make warehouse management software, transportation management software. There's a lot of software behind when you click buy on a website, all of the software that makes that possible for that package to get to your door. That's the supply chain software world that I found myself in and it fit perfectly because I love technology. I love computers. I love everything about coding, kind of self-taught coder. Did a little bit of coding in school, but had been coding on the side since high school. Have worked at a few companies after Manhattan. Did a business intelligence startup. Went to a couple smaller boutique consulting firms, but knew that I wanted to start my own company. I really enjoyed the flexibility and working for myself and setting my own boundaries.

Actually, at about the end of 2019 is when I started working for myself. I knew pretty quickly that I wanted to do some kind of a product, but found out very early on that that is a long haul. That is a really long, long stretch to get there. I had to start bringing in revenue somehow. That's where the first business emerged, which is more of contract development, custom software development side, where I'm doing work for clients and building out custom pieces of software. Got that up and running and got some of the revenue coming in so I could pay the bills. That's when I really started focusing on what became PorterLogic, which is a supply chain platform that allows companies to add agility and flexibility and resilience into their supply chain software. It's definitely been a journey and it will continue to be a journey. I think that's one of the most important things is that we all enjoy the journey that we're on, but I absolutely love where I'm at.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

That's awesome. How long have you had PorterLogic?

Jonathan Porter:

PorterLogic itself has been operating for a little less than a year at this point. We started off by doing a lot of market research, customer discovery. Really trying to hone in on the problem that we wanted to solve. We knew the arena that we wanted to operate in, but really wanted to focus in and niche down on a particular problem to solve, not trying to be too broad at first. Then we built out the technology platform. I did most of that. I'm, like I said, a coder/engineer, so built that out. We're in the pilot phase right now. I'm working on proving out the system, getting a couple of these proof of concepts going so that we can really... We know the value that we bring, but at the same time, making sure that the market is there and that we can really prove what we believe. With the goal of really broader launching towards the end of this year and into next year kind of opening up to a broader market.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Yeah, no, that's awesome. You're from Atlanta, from Georgia. You went to Georgia Tech. What did you study there?

Jonathan Porter:

Studied industrial and systems engineering actually. It's an excellent program. Just, generally speaking, it really helps you understand systems and processes. I originally was thinking of doing mechanical engineering actually but went to a meeting with, I think it was the dean or somebody up in the mechanical engineering school. The story that they happened to tell me, nothing bad about mechanical engineering, but they told me a story about designing ductwork for buildings. It just didn't sound as appealing to me. That's really what made me say, okay, let me look at some of these other engineerings and found industrial. It really fits the way that my mind works. I'm extremely analytical and just very logical. I break down systems. I mean, even just walking around the house, I'm optimizing the route and how many stops. I mean, I'm definitely a nerd. There's no hiding that.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Does that tie in with your business?

Jonathan Porter:

I would say absolutely. I think anything about code and software is that you have to be able to think that way. It takes a mindset of being able to see a problem and break it down into its steps because then that's how you go out and do the coding of it. Yeah, I would definitely say that that plays to the business.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

When we looked at the website and we were doing a little bit of research to get a feel for what you guys have out there in the marketplace, I saw low-code. We do a lot of work with software companies. We've seen no-code advertised. There's a lot of these different catchphrases that we see out there. What does that mean for you guys? How much, that distinction between no-code, low-code, full development. How do you walk that line? What's underneath the hood?

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, it's a great question. It's a hot topic right now. A lot of people are talking no-code, low-code and the line blurs definitely. I don't think that there's a super formal definition necessarily. In my opinion, it seems like low-code is where it is very visual-based editors that you're using to create whatever that technology is set out to create, whether that's creating other applications or just generally speaking other low-code, no-code systems. We are very much calling ourselves low-code because our target user is more in the somewhat technical arena. We're not necessarily saying that it's a full-time developer that's going to use this, but somebody traditionally probably in the IT department of a supply chain organization.

We have plans to further expand into full business users and citizen developers, the term you're hearing a lot now. We do want to broaden that, that user base, but we're putting our foot in the ground at low-code because I think a lot of the no-code systems kind of miss the mark in the functionality. I mean, there are many systems that are great at what they do.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

And make big claims.

Jonathan Porter:

Well, but it's hard to sometimes really get the functionality you need out of that. That's where more of this low-code can capitalize on the efficiency gains because, I say this coming as a software developer, coding full development is extremely inefficient, especially for one off custom needs. Building a technology platform, well, that's one thing. If you're just trying to build your one thing, it's an inefficient way to do it. We benefit and get everything from that kind of visual editors, drag-and-drop. We speed up the process but still then have that level of detail that you can get to in order to really achieve the functionality you need.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Sure. Yeah. No, I think that's what it seems like is if I'm wanting to build, let's say a CRM or just something for my business and I want to start from scratch, I'm literally, and I bring you in just start at the very foundation of it, you got to do everything literally from scratch. That's a hugely expensive project. Like you said, very inefficient. The appeal of that low-code, it's like the guts of it are already there and in place and you can just customize it. I'm sure that its capabilities grow over time too.

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Because you're still having to build things behind the scenes.

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

To appeal to a broader audience.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah. It's definitely not low-code behind the scenes, I'll say that.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

That's right.

Jonathan Porter:

But no, you're absolutely right. I mean, every company, every organization does have things that are unique about the way that they operate. It's very difficult in today's business landscape to find off-the-shelf software that's going to do exactly what you need. I mean, even down to, you mentioned CRMs, but I mean, communication tools, all of them. I mean, they all have pros and cons and that's the challenge when you're building off-the-shelf software is that you have to try and appeal to the broadest market but you end up missing some of that at the end there. I think that's where tools like PorterLogic, and there's a lot of other low-codes out there. But specifically, the way that we're building PorterLogic is meant to be a layer on top of existing supply chain technologies.

That's I think one of the unique things, unique opportunities we've seen in the market is that we're not trying to replace existing technology. I mean, there's a lot of excellent warehouse management systems out there, transportation management. Those are massive systems that are taking 12 to 18 months to implement and are extremely expensive. We're just trying to make those easier to work with.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Are we talking about, let's say I'm in manufacturing or I'm some kind of logistics or something like that. I'm somewhere in the supply chain. I could have, what, two, three, four, six different pieces of software that are running in my office.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah. I would say at least.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

We're talking about integrations from one thing to another.

Jonathan Porter:

That's part of it.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

I've got two different tools that I use and I want them to be integrated to each other.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah. That's definitely part of it. That's a big piece of supply chain technology—making all the systems talk because there's just the best of breeds in different arenas. Some people are going to be better at building order management. Some people are better at warehouse management. So yes, you end up with a lot of different software, usually from different vendors. Making them talk is a challenge. That's one of the things we are building into PorterLogic to make that easier. One of the things that we're really trying to capitalize on as well is exactly that, the plethora of systems out there. We don't want you to have an additional three or four systems just to make your core systems talk to each other and work together. We want to have one system that you can layer on top that's going to be an extra layer of everything you need to make those core systems do their job most effectively and let you operate your business the way that you want to.

It's just blown me away in my supply chain career how unique some of the requirements really get. I mean, just a small example. I did a project with a large foodservice distributor distributing to restaurants. Just the level of detail about the food requirements and how they're stored. That certain product can't be stored on top of others. Because I mean, you wouldn't want raw chicken dripping on vegetables or something. I mean, it's all logical things but it's just so specific. Shellfish is always something that stands out in my mind. It's funny, but the receiving requirements of bringing a box of shellfish product into a warehouse is astronomical. It's just things like that that an off-the-shelf package software, it's never going to be able to cover.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Not even close.

Jonathan Porter:

It's not efficient for them too either. I mean, it's not in their best interest to build that level of custom functionality into their technology. That's where I think PorterLogic has real synergy with some of this other software and other vendors. We're not looking to compete, we're looking to make your systems better. We're looking to let your clients do what they want to do while also still using your software.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

We're talking maybe, maybe I'm a smaller, medium-sized player somewhere along the chain.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, we typically go for the medium to small enterprise. We don't try and go after the huge like the Fortune 50.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Not the startups, not the huge whales.

Jonathan Porter:

We have this nice chunk in the middle there.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

It's like, I've got this one main thing that is my, like what you would call the core of the system where we live in a lot. Then I have lots of other things that we use. Are we talking about coming in and doing a consultation where we assess the whole landscape and maybe build, actually do build something but on the platform and where it potentially might replace a few of the peripheral things that you're using? You maybe go from eight systems down to four and something like that. I mean, is it that type of thing? I mean, you're doing a full-service kind of a survey at the beginning.

Jonathan Porter:

You can do that. We do definitely offer professional services type consulting, engagements like that. Really where we see it going is more empowering the company to do a lot of this themselves. That's one of the things that I found early in my career is that folks on the industry side per se, the folks working at the supply chain organizations, whether it's in the IT departments or just in your operations side, very handcuffed to a lot of the vendors. You choose a couple of vendors and you rely on them a lot. If that relationship doesn't pan out or for whatever reason, you're stuck. We see a real opportunity to help let the companies themselves give them the tools that they need to enable their processes, enable their system.

Of course, we're always here to help. We can do exactly, as you're saying, some of that consulting type work to analyze your systems. We can help you eliminate systems if that's your goal. But like I said, we work with a number of other systems. That's not necessarily a goal of ours. We're just trying to help you get as much value as possible. If that means you simplifying your systems, then we can absolutely help you there.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

That's great. Potentially a SaaS model then too?

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

I mean, that may be more the direction is, is what you're saying.

For our audience that doesn't know, what is SaaS?

Jonathan Porter:

SaaS is software as a service. Yes, we are a SaaS. Essentially, what that means is instead of buying the software outright, is that we are providing the software to you as a service. You're typically subscribing to that, whether that's on a per transaction basis. We do more of an annual subscription. Some people will do monthly subscriptions. It's a term that's really started to come into business software recently, but you know SaaS throughout everything. I mean, anything that you're subscribing to on a monthly basis from a software perspective, whether that's an app or email, whatever that might be, that could fall into that SaaS category. We are SaaS. We are true cloud-native. That's one of the things that we really see the supply chain going is it's starting that huge cloud transition. You may be asking, well, hasn't cloud already happened? In some industries, absolutely.

I mean, we've been benefiting from cloud technologies for 10, 15, 20 years at this point. But the nature of supply chain software is such that it is, I mean, it's mission-critical to these companies. There's been some lagging behind in accepting the cloud benefits and moving some of these technologies into the cloud. But really over the last three to five years, we've seen an acceleration in that. I think that that's one of the areas that the supply chain software industry still really has to grow is to continue that move into the cloud just because there are so many benefits just from... I mean, you can look at it just from the hard numbers and the cost. You do have a lot of savings working in a cloud environment.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Just the agility.

Jonathan Porter:

The agility. It just makes it easier all around. It makes it easier for your vendors to service the software. It makes it easier for you to get updates on it security-wise. I know cloud security is a topic that comes up a lot, but my opinion is traditionally I mean, these cloud providers are spending millions and millions of dollars making their system secure. I think that more often than not, cloud provider security is going to be far greater than the security that your own team may be able to provide.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

A legacy installed software that gets updated once or twice a year is never going to be able to keep up with something in the cloud that's getting updated daily, hourly, to the minute.

Jonathan Porter:

Very, very true.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Evolving threats. Yeah, I think cloud got them beat there.

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Hands down. When it comes to the supply chain, I mean, I think of logistics and supply chain is like just a 10 million pound dinosaur. Right? I think of it as like there are all these different companies along the way that are all shipping from one place to the next. We've seen this a lot in the last year with all kinds of products.

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Everything. Go try to buy a new car or a computer or anything.

Jonathan Porter:

Housing supplies.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Electronic. I mean, we could probably talk about that in great detail, but I'm sure you know a lot about it. I mean, it makes sense that that industry didn't adopt the cloud early on. They just have so many different things that they're involved in. It's such a complex process that they just dug their heels in and stuck around with what they had. They're really right for disruption.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah. I think it really is time for the cloud to take a bigger step in the supply chain software world. I do understand where a lot of these organizations are coming from. That if a warehouse management system for a large distributor is down even for a couple of minutes, I mean, that can cause chaos of ripple effects. It's not just the immediate time it's down, but it can throw your warehousing operation off for days if you're not trying to recover from something like that. I very much can understand where these companies and organizations are coming from. But I think that a lot of that has progressed and come up within the last three to five years. A lot of times, these are guaranteed SLAs or service level agreements.

The cloud providers and even the SaaS software companies will contractually guarantee you, okay, your systems will be available, typically I mean, it's like 99.99% of the time. It's a very high number. Those are contractually obligated types of things. If your provider is not adhering to those, well, then you can get some recourse from that. I think that those types of things and just other success stories too. Some of the early adopters, other companies have been able to see, okay, this is what company ABC has done and they've been successful moving their supply chain systems into the cloud. There's just that building level of confidence. There's that building momentum of, all right, the technology is finally there that we really can take advantage of this.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Sure. Why did the whole world run out of computer chips? What happened? What's going on? We can't buy anything with chips.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, it's an extremely complicated question. I'm probably only qualified to comment on a small portion of it because you'd have to probably really talk to an economist and all kinds of different people to understand fully.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Just not making enough.

Jonathan Porter:

There's a concept that you learn. I learned it in supply chain classes at Georgia Tech called the bullwhip effect. If you can imagine what a bullwhip looks like, I mean, probably not the best name, but you can imagine what this curving whip looks like that the end consumer is the smallest at the beginning. They're going to see this fewest kind of variations in the whole supply chain. But just due to the way that ordering from different vendors works, as you move farther and farther back into, farther up the tier of suppliers, that becomes much more pronounced. A 10 unit fluctuation in demand at the consumer-level could result in millions of units of fluctuations to the raw materials provider. It's those types of things that are just when demand shifts as drastically as it did during the pandemic, it's extremely hard for these upstream suppliers to recover.

I mean, I don't know the specifics, but it could easily go back to the raw materials coming out of the ground to make some of the silicon and the chips and things, that is what got out of whack and has led to some of these other shortages. But I think it's also a combination of things. I mean, there's been manufacturing challenges as well that, I mean, we’re just reaching capacity, which sounds crazy, but I mean, the demand is so high for chips now. It's a three to five-year process to build some of these foundries that are making these things. It takes a long time.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

It's a perfect storm.

Jonathan Porter:

Exactly.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Crazy high demand, not enough people. COVID happened. You've got maybe capacity manufacturing.

Jonathan Porter:

A perfect storm is the best way to-

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Everything has one in it. I mean, a teddy bear that talks to you that you pull the cord on, it's got a little chip in there probably.

Jonathan Porter:

It probably does.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

That's picking out what thing to say.

Jonathan Porter:

Most people don't think about, I mean, every car just about nowadays, I mean, has a computer chip, if not multiple computer chips in it. Don't quote me on the source, but I remember seeing somewhere that the average luxury car nowadays has almost 200 million lines of code running all the various different pieces of it, which is hard to fathom. That's just mind-boggling.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Truck manufacturers. I saw this a couple of months ago. They were building the trucks. I think GMC was doing this, maybe Ford as well. I don't know, maybe Toyota even. A lot of the big ones. They were building the vehicles. They didn't have all of the components they needed so they were just building them anyway and just parking them in a huge holding lot.

Jonathan Porter:

That surprises me.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

They had just tens of thousands of 98% finished vehicles that were just sitting there waiting. They're just like, we're going to keep going anyway. I think they even had a name for it, build-shy. They were literally just almost finishing and just keep the line moving.

Jonathan Porter:

Hopefully, we start to see some of these supply chain fluctuations working themselves out, but I will say for the industry overall, I mean, there's a huge spotlight now shined on the supply chain. I mean, where it used to maybe just be something people in the industry are talking about. Everyone is now very aware of we couldn't get toilet paper, we couldn't get hands sanitizer, all of these things. It's now very much in the forefront of people's minds that this is, it can affect our daily life. It can affect everything. You start thinking about scenarios where food supply chains, like how critical is that to the way that we live nowadays. It's things that folks that worked in the supply chain knew about, but it's now so much in the forefront of everyone's mind that I think there's going to be continued innovation and continued investment in the technology that power supply chains. That's where I think that PorterLogic is really in a good position, and we’re poised well.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Well, a spotlight being on the industry puts you guys in a wonderful position because the conversations you're having with these people that are looking at this, it's very relevant.

Question. It seems like just from listening to everything that you've become an expert, and of course, your industry has been very knowledgeable of what you do, but then also customer service and customer satisfaction. Tell us about how important that is in what you do and how you developed it and how our audience can develop it in what they do.

Jonathan Porter:

Great question. I really think that a lot of success in business does come back to the relationships and how you deal with the people on your team, your customers. I mean, you really have to look at it as a partnership, especially where we're at. I mentioned we're piloting a lot of the software. That is very much built on relationships. I think that probably the best advice that I could give just generally speaking of what's worked for me is you have to be doing something that you really enjoy. I mean, you can tell, I love software and I love supply chain. It's like the perfect marriage. If you're not doing something you enjoy, it's difficult to service customers and really have that full team partnership feel. People can see that kind of stuff. I think that that's one of the things is to find somewhere that you really love and enjoy working, and then it won't be as big of a challenge.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

It comes more natural.

Jonathan Porter:

Exactly. Yes. I think it's just, we only have so long that we're all here and only so long, even a shorter amount of time that we can all work. Right. It's like, why spend your time doing something that you don't enjoy? I think that's one of the beauties of entrepreneurship. I mean, it's the world that we're in. Meanwhile, starting a company is by no means easy. It is a better time to be starting a company than 50 or 100 years ago. I mean, just the technology and the resources. Shopify is one that is a company I look up to a ton. I mean, they have just made it so easy that you can set up an online store and start selling. I mean, I'm not trying to do a sales pitch for them, but it's very easy. A lot of those types of technologies are making it a great time to be starting a business, but that would be maybe the advice and caution all wrapped in one is do it in something that you really love and enjoy.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

If you weren't doing PorterLogic, what do you think you'd be doing?

Jonathan Porter:

That's an interesting question actually. I'm going to give a boring answer and that I love what I'm doing. I mean, I love coding. I love technology. I do really love supply chain as well. Even if it wasn't PorterLogic, I would say it would be something in this arena still. I mean, every day I wake up just feeling so lucky that I've built what I have and that I'm able to do what I do. I mean, it doesn't feel like work. I know that sounds so cliche.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

No. It's halfway almost a trick question because I feel like if you do have a backup plan, then you're not going to put 100% into what you do. That's good that you don't have a backup plan.

Jonathan Porter:

I would agree. I mean, extreme focus is one of the only ways to succeed in entrepreneurship. I mean, if you don't know exactly what you're doing and focus on your niche and your customers and your problem you're solving, I mean, there are so many other people doing it kind of to my point earlier about it. It is easier to start a company. I mean, that brings a lot of competition in the types of folks that are starting companies. I think that it's important.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Yeah. I mean, something that my husband tells me all the time is to be a student of your profession.

Jonathan Porter:

I love that.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

He's been telling me that for a while. I totally get it, because it makes you, of course, better at what you do and better than some of your competition. Even if you're not trying to compete with other companies, but it just makes you just great at what you do.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Let me see. How can we find you? What's your website? Do you have social media? Phone number?

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, porterlogic.com. You can find us. We are mostly on LinkedIn and Twitter, so PorterLogic @porterlogic on Twitter and LinkedIn as well. I guess LinkedIn doesn't have like an @. They need to brand that somehow. But yeah, the company page is PorterLogic. Those are probably the best ways to find out more about us. You can always email me, jonathan@porterlogic.com.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Jonathan without an H.

Jonathan Porter:

Without an H. Yes. Jonathan is a surprisingly, it's a common name with a surprising number of spelling.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Yup. My husband's name is John with an H, so I always remember the different spellings.

Jonathan Porter:

There you go. J-O-N-A-T-H-A-N, Jonathan.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Got it. Then how can we help you as far as referrals or anything goes?

Jonathan Porter:

I mentioned it a little bit earlier. The target customer we go after is that mid-size to small enterprise supply chain organization. Really any company that operates their own supply chain, whether that's a trucking fleet to a warehouse. I mean, even just managing orders that you might have a third-party logistics company fulfilling. Anybody, any companies that have that kind of operations going, we can help with. I think that anybody that you guys know or that is listening or anything like that needs some added flexibility and agility in their operations, I'd say give us a call.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Awesome. We will keep that in mind. Thanks for coming on with us. We appreciate you coming out here.

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely. This has been a lot of fun. I really enjoyed it.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

I was going to say we had a good time.

Jonathan Porter:

Yeah, thanks so much.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

A lot of good conversation.

Jonathan Porter:

Absolutely.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

Make sure you all check them out on LinkedIn, website. Email them if you got questions or anything. Yeah, thanks.

Jonathan Porter:

Thank you so much.

Burn the Ship Hosts:

We'll see you all in the next episode.

All right. Have a great day.